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Ativan | Klonopin | Oxycontin | Xanax | Adderall | Alcohol
Cocaine | Heroin | Crystal Meth

Ativan

What you need to know about Ativan:

Generic Name: Lorazepam
Therapeutic Class: Anxiety
Popular Street Names: Control, Silence
Side Effects: Confusion, depressed mood, thoughts of suicide, hyperactivity, feeling light headed, drowsiness, sleep problems, muscle weakness, lack of coordination, amnesia or forgetfulness, trouble concentrating, appetite changes, and skin rash

Ativan is commonly referred to as Lorazepam. It is a central nervous system depressant that is classified as a benzodiazepine. It is used to slow the brain down and is commonly used to treat anxiety, acute stress reactions, panic disorders, insomnia and depression.

Ativan users can become physically dependent after as little as one week of therapeutic use. Signs of Ativan prescription drug abuse are:

  • Consuming a higher dosage than what is prescribed by the doctor
  • Using Ativan for longer than prescribed causing prescription drug abuse
  • Taking it for non-medical reasons
  • Developing an increased tolerance for Ativan
  • Doctor shopping to get multiple Ativan prescriptions
  • Forging prescriptions for Ativan
  • Experiencing Ativan withdrawal signs and symptoms when you don’t take it
  • Detoxing from Ativan after reducing medication or discontinuing use
  • Continued use of Ativan to avoid withdrawal
  • Unsteadiness
  • Visual and memory problems
  • Auditory hallucinations
  • Suicidal thoughts
  • Drowsiness, confusion
  • Depression
  • Slurred speech
  • Impaired judgment
  • Abnormal temperature regulation
  • Demonstrating an overall loss of control or obsessive-compulsive drug seeking behavior
  • Continued use of Ativan in spite of clearly adverse consequences

Due to the fact that Ativan is a high-risk abuse drug, it is also a high-risk overdose drug. Signs of Ativan overdose include:

  • Coma
  • Hypertension
  • Ataxia
  • Hypotonia
  • Impaired motor functions
  • Respiratory depression and arrest
  • Mental confusion
  • Difficulty staying awake
  • Nausea

Withdrawal symptoms like tremors, dizziness, headaches and irritability can occur after taking therapeutic doses of Ativan for as little as one week. Withdrawal from Ativan can cause severe and fatal symptoms including death. It is for this reason that Ativan use should not be stopped all at once. Instead, it should be reduced slowly in a medically supervised environment to ensure safety.

WARNING: Overdosage of benzodiazepines is usually manifested by varying degrees of central-nervous-system depression, ranging from drowsiness to coma. In mild cases symptoms include drowsiness, mental confusion and lethargy. In more serious examples, symptoms may include ataxia, hypotonia, hypotension, hypnosis, stages one (1) to three (3) coma, and, very rarely, death.

For prescription drug abuse help call 800-585-7527.

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Klonopin

What you need to know about Klonopin:

Generic Name: Clonazepam
Therapeutic Class: Anti-seizure and anti-panic
Popular Street Names: Tranks, downers, benzos, k-pin
Side Effects: confusion, hallucinations, hyperactivity, agitation, weak or shallow breathing, depressed mood, thoughts of suicide, chest tightness, fast heartbeat, painful urination, pale skin, easy bruising or bleeding, seizures, drowsiness, memory problems, runny or stuffy nose, headaches, skin rash, and weight changes

Klonopin is a central nervous system depressant classified as a benzodiazepine. It is used to slow the brain down and is commonly used to treat anxiety, panic disorders, epilepsy, insomnia, restless leg syndrome, Tourette syndrome, schizophrenia and depression.

Klonopin has a high risk of being abused and long-term use always leads to low-dose dependence. Signs of Klonopin prescription drug abuse are:

  • Consuming a higher dosage than what is prescribed by the doctor
  • Taking it for non medical purposes
  • Developing an increased tolerance for Klonopin
  • Seeing multiple doctors to get extra Klonopin prescriptions
  • Forging prescriptions for Klonopin
  • Experiencing Klonopin withdrawal signs and symptoms when you don’t take it
  • Continued use of Klonopin to avoid withdrawal
  • Auditory hallucinations
  • Demonstrating an overall loss of control or obsessive compulsive drug seeking behavior
  • Continued use of Klonopin in spite of clearly adverse consequences

IF YOU ARE EXPERIENCING THESE SYMPTOMS FROM KLONOPIN ABUSE, YOU SHOULD IMMEDIATELY CALL 800-585-7527 FOR HELP.

Those experiencing Klonopin withdrawal might experience psychosis, aggressiveness and even hallucinations. Signs of a Klonopin overdose include:

  • Coma
  • Hypotension
  • Impaired motor functions
  • Mental confusion
  • Difficulty staying awake
  • Nausea

Klonopin use should not be stopped all at once and should be reduced slowly in a medically supervised environment to ensure patient safety.

WARNING: Withdrawal symptoms, similar in character to those noted with barbiturates and alcohol (eg, convulsions, psychosis, hallucinations, behavioral disorder, tremor, abdominal and muscle cramps) have occurred following abrupt discontinuance of clonazepam.  The more severe withdrawal symptoms have usually been limited to those patients who received excessive doses over an extended period of time.

For prescription drug abuse help call 800-585-7527.

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Oxycontin

What you need to know about Oxycontin:

Generic Name: Oxycodone hydrochloride
Therapeutic Class: Analgesic
Popular Street Names: 40, 80, blue, hillbilly heroin, kicker, cotton
Side Effects: shallow breathing, slow heartbeat, seizures, clammy skin, severe weakness, fainting, sweating, itching, dry mouth, constipation, loss of appetite

OxyContin is a powerful analgesic opiate that blocks the perception of pain in the brain. It is commonly prescribed for pain relief after surgery, to cancer patients, and for chronic pain sufferers. According to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, misuse of OxyContin has significantly increased since 2002.

OxyContin has a high risk of physical dependence because it has a significantly larger amount of the active ingredient, Oxycodone, than other prescription pain relievers. It is intended to be a time-release medication, but abusers often disable the time-release component making misuse extremely dangerous.

Signs of OxyContin prescription drug abuse are:

  • Crushing the medications to disable the time-release component
  • Consuming a higher dosage than what is prescribed by your doctor
  • Using OxyContin for a longer time period than prescribed
  • Taking it for non-medical purposes
  • Developing an increased tolerance
  • Seeing multiple doctors to get OxyContin prescriptions
  • Forging prescriptions for OxyContin
  • Experiencing OxyContin withdrawal when you do not take it
  • Continuing use to avoid OxyContin withdrawal symptoms
  • Overall loss of control or obsessive compulsive drug-seeking behavior

IF YOU ARE EXPERIENCING THESE SYMPTOMS FROM OXYCONTIN ABUSE, YOU SHOULD IMMEDIATELY CALL 800-585-7527 FOR HELP.

Signs of an OxyContin overdose include:

  • Severe respiratory depression
  • Respiratory arrest
  • Unconsciousness
  • Coma

OxyContin withdrawal can be very intense. Symptoms often include flu-like symptoms, anxiety, diarrhea, vomiting and even muscle spasms. Withdrawal from OxyContin can cause severe and fatal symptoms including death. It is for this reason that OxyContin should be reduced slowly in a medically supervised environment to ensure patient safety.

WARNING: Misuse of OxyContin promotes physical dependence, abuse, and addiction. The two highest-strength OxyContin tablets—80 and 160 milligrams—are dangerous for anyone who has not already developed a tolerance for narcotics. If you have been prescribed one of these strengths, do not give the tablets to anyone else; they could impair respiration and lead to death.

For prescription drug abuse help call 800-585-7527.

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Xanax

What you need to know about Xanax:

Generic Name: Alprazolam
Therapeutic Class: Antianxiety
Popular Street Names: Xany, blue footballs, xanybars
Side Effects: hyperactivity, unusual risk-taking behavior, decreased inhibitions, agitation, hallucinations, seizure, muscle twitching, jaundice, drowsiness, amnesia, blurred vision, loss of interest in sex, dry or watery mouth, increased sweating

Xanax is a central nervous system depression classified as a benzodiazepine. It is commonly prescribed to treat anxiety, panic disorders, insomnia, and acute stress reactions. Xanax produces a calming effect in the brain and helps the body relax. It produces sedation and can be used to induce sleep, relieve anxiety and prevent seizures.

While most people that take Xanax are prescribed the medication, Xanax is a high-risk drug for being abused and long-term use always leads to low-dose dependency.

Signs of Xanax prescription drug abuse include:

  • Consuming a higher dosage than what is prescribed by your doctor
  • Using Xanax for a longer time period than prescribed
  • Taking it for non-medical purposes
  • Developing an increased tolerance for Xanax
  • Engaging in doctor shopping to get extra Xanax prescriptions
  • Forging prescriptions for Xanax
  • Experiencing Xanax withdrawal signs and symptoms when you don’t take it
  • Continued use of Xanax to avoid withdrawal
  • Auditory hallucinations
  • Demonstration of overall loss of control or obsessive compulsive drug seeking behavior
  • Continued Xanax abuse in spite of clearly adverse consequences

IF YOU ARE EXPERIENCING THESE SYMPTOMS FROM XANAX ABUSE, YOU SHOULD IMMEDIATELY CALL 800-585-7527 FOR HELP.

Signs of a Xanax overdose include:

  • Coma
  • Hypotension
  • Impaired motor functions
  • Respiratory depression and arrest
  • Mental confusion
  • Difficulty staying awake
  • Nausea

The use of Xanax for anything other than what it is prescribed for can have a variety of dangerous health consequences including overdose, toxic reactions, respiratory depression, hypertension, seizures, cardiovascular collapse and even death. It is for this reason that Xanax should not be stopped all at once. Instead it should be reduced slowly in a medically supervised environment to ensure patient safety.

WARNING: Certain adverse clinical events, some life threatening, are a direct consequence of physical dependence to Xanax. These include a spectrum of withdrawal symptoms; the most important is seizure. 

For prescription drug abuse help call 800-585-7527.

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Adderall

What you need to know about Adderall:

Generic Name: Amphetamine and dextroamphetamine
Therapeutic Class: Psychostimulant
Popular Street Names: Peaches
Side Effects: Increased blood pressure, sudden death, stroke, heart attack, decreased appetite, changes in vision and behavioral changes

Adderall is typically used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and narcolepsy. Like other stimulant drugs, Adderall directly affects the mesolimbic “reward” pathway in the brain.

Adderall abuse has become progressively more popular among college students due to the fact that it creates a high that can last for up to 48 hours. Adderall is most commonly referred to by these abusers as “the study drug.” Adderall has a high risk of being abused and long-term use always leads to low-dose dependence. Signs of Adderall prescription drug abuse are:

  • Consume a higher dosage than what is prescribed by the doctor
  • Taking Adderall for non medical purposes
  • Developing an increased tolerance for Adderall
  • Seeing multiple doctors to get extra Adderall prescriptions
  • Forging prescriptions for Adderall
  • Experience Adderall withdrawal signs and symptoms when you don’t take it
  • Continued use of Adderall to avoid withdrawal
  • Continued Adderall abuse in spite of clearly adverse consequences

IF YOU ARE EXPERIENCING THESE SYMPTOMS FROM ADDERALL ABUSE, PLEASE CALL 800-585-7527 FOR HELP.

Those experiencing Adderall withdrawal might experience psychosis, aggressiveness and even hallucinations. Signs of a Adderall overdose include:

  • Restlessness
  • Tremor
  • Muscle twitches
  • Rapid breathing
  • Confusion
  • Hallucination
  • Panic
  • Dark colored urine

Adderall use should not be stopped all at once and should be reduced slowly in a medically supervised environment to ensure patient safety.

WARNING: Withdrawal from Adderall can cause severe and fatal symptoms including heart failure, seizures and even death.

For prescription drug abuse help call 800-585-7527.

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Alcohol

What you need to know about Alcohol Abuse:

Alcohol abuse is a disease characterized by excessive and continuous drinking despite negative health, social and legal consequences. The craving that an alcoholic feels can be as strong as the need for food and water. It feels like a necessity. Long term heavy drinking can increase the risk of cancer, heart disease, liver damage, brain damage and birth defects. It also increases the risk from car accidents, homicide and suicide.

Signs of alcohol abuse include:

  • Drinking to calm nerves or forget worries
  • Lying about drinking and trying to hide drinking habits
  • Having medical, social or financial troubles caused by drinking
  • Failure to fulfill major work, school or home responsibilities because of drinking
  • Drinking in situations that are physically dangerous, like driving

Withdrawal from alcohol can cause severe and fatal symptoms including heart failure, seizures and even death.

For alcohol abuse help call 800-585-7527.

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Cocaine

What you need to know about Cocaine Addiction:

Popular Street Names: Coke, blow, snow, 8balls

Cocaine is currently the most abused stimulant in the United States. It is a powerful central nervous system stimulant that is highly addictive. Cocaine increases levels of dopamine in the brain, which leads to feelings of euphoria, increased energy and mental alertness. It is typically administered in three ways: through the nose, injected or smoked.

Cocaine addiction has a variety of adverse effects on the body. Cocaine constricts the blood vessels, dilates pupils, and increases body temperature, heart rate and blood pressure. Cocaine abusers often experience acute cardiovascular, or cerebrovascular emergencies, such as a heart attack.

Signs of cocaine addiction include:

  • Red, bloodshot eyes
  • Runny nose or frequent sniffing
  • Weight loss
  • Increased heart rate and blood pressure
  • Nosebleeds
  • Altered motor activities
  • Stealing, lying or financial problems
  • Loss of interest in family or friends
  • Poor work or school performance
  • Erratic behavior
  • Auditory hallucinations
  • Paranoia
  • Continued cocaine abuse despite clearly adverse consequences

IF YOU ARE EXPERIENCING THESE SYMPTOMS FROM COCAINE ADDICTION, CALL 800-585-7527 FOR HELP.

Cocaine withdrawal can be very intense including agitation, fatigue, generalized malaise and increased appetite.

For cocaine addiction treatment call 800-585-7527.

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Heroin

What you need to know about Heroin:

Popular Street Names: Tina, dope, dragon, black tar, chiba, smack

Heroin is processed from morphine, a naturally occurring substance extracted from the seedpod of certain varieties of poppy plants. Due to the fact that heroin is often administered via a needle, heroin users are at higher risk for the transmission of HIV, hepatitis b & c and other diseases that can be transferred from needle to needle.

Heroin, although usually injected, can also be snorted or smoked. Chronic use of heroin leads to health problems including collapsed veins, heart lining and valve infections, liver disease, tuberculosis and lung infections.

Signs of heroin addiction include:

  • Injection sites and/or infections
  • Scarred and collapsed veins
  • Disorientation, poor mental functioning
  • Constricted pupils
  • Depressed respiration
  • Nausea/vomiting
  • Arthritis and other rheumatologic problems
  • Liver and kidney disease
  • Difficulty speaking
  • Spontaneous miscarriage
  • Little or no motivation
  • Unkempt appearance
  • Missing cash and valuables or borrowing or stealing money
  • Developing an increased tolerance for heroin
  • Continued use of heroin to avoid withdrawal
  • Demonstration of an overall loss of control or obsessive-compulsive drug seeking behavior
  • Continued use of heroin in spite of clearly adverse consequences

IF YOU ARE EXPERIENCING THESE SYMPTOMS FROM HEROIN ABUSE, YOU SHOULD IMMEDIATELY CALL 800-585-7527 FOR HELP.

Signs of a heroin overdose include:

  • Coma
  • Shallow and labored breathing
  • Respiratory death
  • Convulsions
  • Pinpoint pupils
  • Clammy skin

Heroin withdrawal can be quite intense and include symptoms like muscle and bone pain, insomnia, diarrhea, vomiting and cold flashes.

Withdrawal from heroin can occur within a few hours after the last time the drug is taken. Most withdrawal symptoms peak between 24 – 48 hours after the last dose of heroin and subside after about a week. Heroin withdrawal can cause death to a fetus of a pregnant addict.

For heroin abuse treatment call 800-585-7527.

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Crystal Meth

What you need to know about Crystal Meth:

Generic Name: Methamphetamine
Therapeutic Class: Psycho-stimulant
Popular Street Names: Tina, meth, ice, speed, crank
Side Effects: Increase of alertness, increase of concentration, energy, induces euphoria, enhances self esteem, and increase in libido

Crystal meth has high potential for abuse and addiction. The drug activates the psychological reward system via a cascading release of dopamine in the brain. In the United States, methamphetamine is FDA approved for the treatment of ADHD and exogenous obesity.

Signs of crystal meth drug abuse are:

  • Consuming a higher dosage than what is prescribed by the doctor
  • Developing meth mouth
  • Reduced appetite
  • Bizarre behavior
  • Paranoia
  • Short term memory loss

IF YOU ARE EXPERIENCING THESE SYMPTOMS FROM CRYSTAL METH ABUSE, YOU SHOULD IMMEDIATELY CALL 800-585-7527 FOR HELP.

Due to the fact that crystal meth is a high-risk abuse drug, it is also a high-risk overdose drug. Signs of crystal meth overdose include:

  • Coma
  • Heart attack or stroke
  • Convulsions
  • Rise in body temperature
  • Increase in blood pressure
  • User sees spots

Withdrawal symptoms from crystal meth primarily consist of fatigue, depression and an increase in appetite. Withdrawal symptoms may last for days with occasional use and weeks or months with chronic use. For chronic users, withdrawal symptoms also include anxiety, irritability, headaches, agitation, akathisia, and hypersomnia. Crystal Meth use should not be stopped all at once. Instead, it should be reduced slowly in a medically supervised environment to ensure safety.

For drug abuse help, please call 800-585-7527.

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